John William Vaughn

Note: Missouriís Confederate Home in Higginsville, Mo., was a place where needy and incapacitated former soldiers and sailors of Southern service could live after proving their service record, financial need and Missouri residency. Read more about the Confederat Home at http://www.mostateparks.com/confedmem/geninfo.htm 

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Paris Mo, June 20th 1918.

Col George P Gross

Higginsville Mo. 

Dear Friend:- 

I am herewith enclosing you the application of John W. Vaughn, who is desirous of entering the Home. I will say that he went through the war with me and I know all about his career and know that he made a good soldier and I think is in every way worthy to be in the Home. 

He has no means of support and has lost the sight of one eye, but he can see pretty well out of the other one, and is able to look after himself in good shape. He is in very good health at the present time and his mind is all right. He has been away in Colorado several years but always kept this as his home and had never lost his citizenship, as he has been back and forth every few years. He has always borne a good character, and has made a good citizen. I hope you will use your influence to have him admitted as I feel satisfied he will not give you any trouble. 

With kindest regards, and best wishes for your success, I remain, 

Very Truly Your Friend, 

Signed W.M. Farrell 

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April 27, 1928 Ė John William Vaughn was born January 4, 1845, being therefore 83-years, 3-months and 2-days old at the time of his death which occurred yesterday. Among his application papers we found a statement from W.M. Farrell, an old Confederate Comrade, which testified in glowing language to his service as a Soldier in Majorís Company of Pindallís Regiment in which he served as a Private. 

This same old Veteran spoke very highly of Comrade Vaughnís character and refinement, and to these letter statements those of us who have lived with him since July 1918 can testify. Though practically blind and not inclined to mix much with his fellowman, he was a gentleman in all that that word implies. 

Perhaps no one of the Veterans have been more appreciative of the constant entertainments which are brought to this Institution by so many interesting friends, and many has been the time when he felt unable to go to a meal and would miss it rather than to put forth the effort to come down stairs and return to his room but when the music started in the parlors he always came and always tried to find opportunity, though blind, to express his appreciation to the entertainer. 

Another quiet, peaceable, appreciative comrade is gone and we are met here to pay our last respects to his good memory as best we may, taking the place of his relatives none of whom find it possible to come today. 

Little is known of his past life, but we learn over long distance that a crippled sister, Mrs. W.T. Brown who lives in Kansas, another sister Miss Bell Vaughn lives at Paris, Mo. and a nephew James Sproul also lives in Paris. 

Letters have in the past come to him from nieces, whose names and addresses are unknown to the writer. 

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Paris Mo, June 20th 1918.

Col George P Gross

Higginsville Mo. 

Dear Friend:- 

I am herewith enclosing you the application of John W. Vaughn, who is desirous of entering the Home. I will say that he went through the war with me and I know all about his career and know that he made a good soldier and I think is in every way worthy to be in the Home. 

He has no means of support and has lost the sight of one eye, but he can see pretty well out of the other one, and is able to look after himself in good shape. He is in very good health at the present time and his mind is all right. He has been away in Colorado several years but always kept this as his home and had never lost his citizenship, as he has been back and forth every few years. He has always borne a good character, and has made a good citizen. I hope you will use your influence to have him admitted as I feel satisfied he will not give you any trouble. 

With kindest regards, and best wishes for your success, I remain, 

Very Truly Your Friend, 

Signed W.M. Farrell 

 

Source: Biography by unknown author and recommendation letter from W.M. Farrell form the John W. Vaughn file at Higginsville, Missouri State Archives. From the files of Brad Taylor; transcribed by Lisa Perry.